Role-Playing Games, Improvisation and Storytelling

The Space Time Deck

The Space·Time Deck is a deck of 67 cards and a few blanks, loosely inspired from Tarot decks, and designed to aid with story improv, including Role-Playing Games and other forms of Storytelling.

Each of the cards is designed to be interpreted on its own, and to be used as part of a narrative role-playing ruleset. For both reasons, cards have both illustrations and symbols.

The Space·Time Deck is used throughout the Plotonomicon for building plots, characters, places, factions, twists, etc. and throughout the N-Dimensional Tourists as a base for resolving obstacles, conflicts, etc.

The Space Time Deck

The Space·Time Deck is a deck of 67 cards and a few blanks, loosely inspired from Tarot decks, and designed to aid with story improv, including Role-Playing Games and other forms of Storytelling.

Each of the cards is designed to be interpreted on its own, and to be used as part of a narrative role-playing ruleset. For both reasons, cards have both illustrations and symbols.

The Space·Time Deck is used throughout the Plotonomicon for building plots, characters, places, factions, twists, etc. and throughout the N-Dimensional Tourists as a base for resolving obstacles, conflicts, etc.

The Plotonomicon: About This Book

As all good things do, this book starts with a story. It’s the story of a Game Master (let’s call her Alice), who spent weeks preparing a campaign for her players. Maybe the Players’s Characters were to be a company of heroes, who would save the land from a dragon. Or maybe they were students in magics, who were expected to find the sinister secrets of the Sorcerous Highschool. Or maybe they were survivors of a zombie apocalypse, who were to spend each of their days hiding from hordes of shambling undead.

N-Dimensional Tourists: Conflict Resolution

THIS CONTENT IS DEPRECATED Playtesting has indicated that these rules don’t work as well as hoped. We’ll leave them here for historical reasons, but newer versions of N-Dimensional Tourists do not use these rules. These rules describes how to resolve Conflicts between two parties or more during a role-playing game using the N-Dimensional Tourists ruleset. This mechanism is designed to be generic enough to handle pretty much any kind, while remaining mostly narrative.

N-Dimensional Tourists: On your Character Sheet

In N-Dimensional Tourists, each major character is defined by: A Card, which is used during improv. Any number of Aspects, which determine what the character can do; 5 Attributes, which determine how good a character is at their tasks; Any number of Specialties, which let them use Attributes in unusual manners; At least one Weakness, which makes their life more complicated. Minor non-player characters are typically described in even broader strokes, at least until the story calls upon them to be defined in more details.

Space·Time Deck: The Suit of Unknown

Well, after the Triumphs and four suits (Paper, Rock, Blade, Serpent), it is time to conclude the Space·Time Deck with its last suit: the Suit of Unknown (you are free to call it the Suit of Spock)! Unknown symbolizes: imagination; intuition; perception; illusions; dreams. Whenever you draw a card of this suit, you are encouraged to integrate any of these concepts to your interpretation. The cards: Ruler Dragon Treasure Soldier Builder Seeker Lover Servant Home Foot (blank, customizable) Teddy bear (blank, customizable) Credits Cards David Teller.

Hello, Indie Rpg Planet!

Thanks Alex Schroeder for putting together the Indie RPG Planet! I believe that the Indie RPG community was sorely missing something like this.

Space·Time Deck: The Suit of Serpents

Did you think the Space·Time Deck was done after the Triumphs; the Suit of Paper; the Suit of Rock; the Suit of Blade? Were it only that it were so simple! Here’s the fourth suit: the Suit of Serpents. Serpents traditionally symbolize: speed; stealth; adaptation; survival; lies; forbidden knowledge; forbidden power; temptation. The cards: Ruler Dragon Treasure Soldier Builder Seeker Lover Servant Home Foot (blank, customizable) Teddy bear (blank, customizable) Credits Cards David Teller.

Conflict Resolution With the Space·Time Deck

Most Role-Playing Games resolve conflicts with dice. But since we have a Space·Time Deck at hand (or any other kind of Tarot-like Deck), let’s see if we can use it to bring about a different manner of resolving conflicts. About Conflicts A Conflict is a scene in which two parties or more have agendas, which cannot be fulfilled simultaneously. In most role-playing games, the most common form of conflict is the combat, but that is by no mean the only form possible: conflict could be car races, social wit, political campaigns, chess, battlefield strategy, attempting to ruin your opponent’s reputation or fortune, popularity contests, football matches, etc.

Space·Time Deck: The Suit of Scissors (or Blades)

After the Suit of Paper and the Suit of Rock, here comes the Suit of Scissor (or perhaps Blades – name to be finalized). Warning Museum-level nudity. Scissors/blade traditionally symbolize: forced change; violence; destiny; death. The cards: Ruler Dragon Treasure Soldier Builder Seeker Lover Servant Home Foot (blank, customizable) Teddy bear (blank, customizable) Note that the blue borders are not part of the cards.

Ronin Time Bureaucrats: Afterlife and the Time Adjustment Foundation

While the Time Federation is forever limited by its Prime Directive, the militarist branches managed to get away with murder, kidnapping and torture by finessing paradoxes. Some cadres of the Time Federation wanted the ability to counter-attack, and managed to create a covert operations branch called the Time Adjustment Foundation. And further is exactly where it goes.